Laws Of Stunning Garden Design

Have you ever wondered how professionals seem to be able to create stunning garden designs? It’s not just because they’re consummate artists. It’s also to do with the fact that they learn certain laws of design, and stick to them.

The good thing about these rules is that they can be applied by anybody, whether you’re a professional garden designer, an amateur enthusiast or a parent. They’re unambiguous and easily adapted to most situations.

Law #1: Plant Similar Plants Together

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Cottage gardens with dozens of different varieties of flowers and plants emerging from a single bed have a certain charm. But, in general, the power of clustering plants together is better than mixing them up and spreading them around the garden. According to Russell Page, one of the most famous landscaping designers of the last century, it is more aesthetically pleasing to see one element in a garden repeated over and over again than to have many competing against each other. In simple English, he was saying to put your pansies in one bed and your tulips in another.

Law #2: Plant Big First, Then Small

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Most gardens have a range of large plants, like trees, medium-sized bushes and small shrubs and flowers. But if you’re starting from scratch, the order in which you plant these items really matters. Planting big first and then going small is important not only to ensure that you get the right composition but also from a purely practical perspective. Many larger plants, such as trees, could require mechanical diggers to plant. Hence, you don’t want delicate shrubs which could be damaged already in the ground before you get started.

Law #3: Go Big And Be Bold

Some gardeners are rather timid when it comes to the size of the features in their garden. But according to experts, it’s almost always better to go bigger. For instance, if you’re deciding whether to go with a tall or a short summer house, a long or a short pool or a wide or a narrow path, the former is almost always the better, even if you feel that you’re space-constrained. Visit Soulscape for ideas.

Law #4: Use The Golden Number

Knot Garden at Little Moreton Hall: Cheshire

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For centuries, something called the Golden Ratio has dominated artistic work. You can find it in the ancient pyramids, the Greek Parthenon and many other places all over the world. In fact, it’s so universal, many archaeologists think it’s about the closest thing there is to objective beauty in the known universe.

The Golden Ratio is just a number which describes the proportions of an object. Numerically, it’s 1:1.6, meaning that the length of one dimension is 1.6 times as long as the other. Gardeners can use this principle in their garden to create beauty, almost free of charge. For instance, raised beds can be carefully calibrated to observe the Golden Ratio, as can patios, terraces, and lawns. The ratio helps to bring a sense of order and stability and always looks good, no matter what the application.

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Tackling an Overgrown Garden in 6 Simple Steps

Tending to a garden can be a rewarding experience, as a well-kept garden always works well to improve the overall appearance of a house. However, it is also true that keeping a garden looking neat and tidy can be an extremely time-consuming task (and time is something that not many of us have to spare). It does not take much for a garden to start looking overgrown, and if action is not taken, things can very easily get out of hand. In many cases, the problem is deciding where to start from. If your garden is showing signs of neglect, these simple steps can help you get it back to looking its best.

Back to the Basics

Take a walk around the garden and make a note of everything that might look out of place. This includes any plants, flowers, or shrubs that have grown too far outside their original shape. Get your pruning scissors out and start cutting back. Keep an eye on the state of overgrown plants though, as in some cases they might have been starved to a point in which they will never grow back. If this is the case, simply dig them out and focus on starting with a blank soil canvas.

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Know your Weeds

Again, you need to assess the damage caused by weeds before deciding your next step. If the soil looks like it has been completely invaded by weeds, it is time to take some serious action and invest in a good-quality chemical weed killer. Also, identify the type of weeds that seem to predominate. Bindweed, docks, horsetail, and nettles can be notoriously difficult to get rid of, so don’t be surprised if it takes a few tries before you can eliminate them completely. If the situation is not too bad, avoid chemical weed killers and opt for mulching instead (see next section).

By this point, you might have a large amount of garden waste in your property. It is useful to hire a man and van service to clear your garden and give you more time to focus on getting it back into shape. Specialized man and van companies like Anyjunk can also provide mini-skips and skip bags, which you can keep until your garden makeover is complete.

Mulching

Mulch has two main functions: aesthetic (as it can rapidly improve the unkempt appearance of a garden) and functional (because it can be used to treat gardens that have been overrun by weeds). To deprive weeds from light and stop them from reproducing, you will need to add a mulch layer of at least 2 inches. Whenever possible, go for an organic mulch, as it will give your garden soil additional levels of moisture and nutrients.

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Plan and Design

You can now start planning how you want your garden to look like. Think about the garden boundaries, repairing or cleaning hard surfaces like steps or paths, and fixing, discarding, or adding structural elements such as pergolas, gazebos, sheds, beds, or arches. Also, decide on whether you want a purely ornamental garden, something more functional, or a bit of both. Do you want/need trees, shrubs, vegetables, or flowers? If you usually don’t have much time to tend to the garden, keep it basic and easy to care for.

Shape It!

The job is almost done and it is now time to give shape to your garden. Use techniques like edging or framing to add structure and to keep things under control. You can also consider adding garden ornaments, like sculptures, furniture, or fountains. The trick is to be creative and to make sure that your garden reflects the style of your home.

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